Artist

In a recent statement, I mentioned being influenced somewhat, by our history of makers in fine art, design and craft. When asked to look to contemporaries and explain influences, I’m pleased to mention a few.

Sam Maloof; woodworker.  In the late 60’s or early 70’s, there was an exhibition traveling the country.  As a young undergraduate .....

In a recent statement, I mentioned being influenced somewhat, by our history of makers in fine art, design and craft. When asked to look to contemporaries and explain influences, I’m pleased to mention a few.

Sam Maloof; woodworker.  In the late 60’s or early 70’s, there was an exhibition traveling the country.  As a young undergraduate student who had recently transferred into a ceramics department, I visited the Oakland Museum of Art in California to view “Objects USA”, a selection of fine crafts.  The exhibit was impressive and the wood working of Sam Maloof fascinated me.  Attention to detail, superb craftsmanship and design, inventive joinery and sensitivity to form and materials seemed paramount in Maloof’s work.  Above all, I remember this exhibition clearly showing me, that there was a life could be had as a maker.  So much work was not only fun, but also compelling as well as diverse in material, execution and idea.

Kazuo Yagi; ceramic artist.  Leader of Sodeisha, a splinter group of ceramic artists in Japan, Yagi led the Japanese to use clay to express contemporary aesthetic issues.  I had studied Japanese Ceramics in undergraduate school and years later, having been asked to start a glass program at a university in Japan, while visiting museums I was continually drawn to Yagi’s work.  Here again I found an inventive use of clay that was not in the traditions that preceded him. Inventive and a seemingly experimental use of his media showed an insight and a fresh interpretation.

Henry Moore; sculptor.  Who would deny the importance of Henry Moore whose abstract figurative work in bronze I find extraordinary.  Some pieces seemed sculpturally compact while other works were more expressively open emphasizing use of negative space, but always form was paramount.  Moore’s work has always been a compellingly visual consideration.

The Unknown Artist; the makers of baskets, ladders, fish catching devices, chairs, often using indigenous materials, these “folk artist” who make by hand, objects of the everyday, for function or fun, I admire and have been inspired by.

Above all, those artists/makers that seem to have an inquiring mind, which tend to explore, are for me, models in which I have found inspiration.

 

-Brent Kee Young, 2018

Join us!

Habatat Glass invites you to celebrate the
46th year of our International Glass Exhibition.

We are extremely proud to have founded the oldest and largest annual glass exhibition in the world.
Grand Opening: Saturday, April 28 at 8pm | Exhibition April 28- June 22