Artist

Being an artist is a full-time job. It is an advocation. I have largely been removed from making for three years while my time was dedicated and focused on teaching. I longed to return to the studio; to be creative again. Not because I saw another artists’ work, or because I was moved by a .....

Being an artist is a full-time job. It is an advocation. I have largely been removed from making for three years while my time was dedicated and focused on teaching. I longed to return to the studio; to be creative again. Not because I saw another artists’ work, or because I was moved by a contemporary art trend and wanted to be part of things again. I have an ingrained passion and desire to create original, personal work that looks to my own life and times and creates work that reflects my geographical place, station of life and personal relationships. These experiences, familiar to most of us, form the greatest influences on my work.

The drive to create never left me, even when I left the studio. I prefer to create as many, if not all of the components for my sculptures myself. I enjoy the challenges of making technically proficient work as well as the insight into the materiality and alternative possibilities that are revealed to the attentive artist. These discoveries or affirmations also influence the work I create. Sometimes my work is grounded in traditional techniques and sometimes my work grows from technical inventiveness. I endeavor to make work that is aesthetically interesting, technically challenging, conceptually stimulating, and above all honest and original. I am fond of analogies, and I use music and musicians as references to the artist’s condition.

I often compare learning to work with glass to learning to play an instrument. You start with familiarizing yourself with the instrument, its sounds, range, tones, the notes, and chords. You learn how to properly position your body while playing. You practice scales and chords. You study and practice these formal procedures until they are familiar and require little attention. You do this, not in the hopes that you will be an excellent player of scales, but in the dream of being able to one day improvise and create your own original compositions. This is what I work towards in making original artwork with glass as my chosen medium. I am motivated to master my material, not as the ultimate goal, but for the freedom to create without the restrictions and compromises imposed on those who do not fully understand their material of expression. Now three years removed from the studio and up to my neck in equipment building, I’m looking to my own work as a starting place before launching into new directions.

To further this musical reference, I would say that contemporary musicians have more of an influence on the work I make than other visuals artists. I allow musicians to influence my mindset everyday as I work in my studio. I listen to their songs without fear of mimicking, copying or being unduly influenced by their work, as I might being immersed in a visual artist’s work. These artists serve as the soundtrack and mood enhancers that my psyche needs to remain in its focused and creative state.

The music I listen to in the studio varies weekly, tends to get overplayed to the point of annoyance, gets forgotten about and then listened to with renewed pleasure many years later. At any point the soundtrack might be classic rock, alternative, new age, folk, indie, and metal. Yesterday was enhanced by Black Sabbath, Neil Young, The National and Death Cab for Cutie.

-Marc Petrovic, 2018

Join us!

Habatat Glass invites you to celebrate the
46th year of our International Glass Exhibition.

We are extremely proud to have founded the oldest and largest annual glass exhibition in the world.
Grand Opening: Saturday, April 28 at 8pm | Exhibition April 28- June 22