Artist

This thematic question had been plaguing me for quite a while since receiving the invitation to be in the exhibition. Generally when I talk about my work I bring up stories of the American pressed glass industry, tales of the long lost colors of the factories and accounts of the many people who send me .....

This thematic question had been plaguing me for quite a while since receiving the invitation to be in the exhibition. Generally when I talk about my work I bring up stories of the American pressed glass industry, tales of the long lost colors of the factories and accounts of the many people who send me old glass from around the country to use in my sculptures. I draw my influences from glass history and particular historic pieces in some of my favorite museums. I love contemporary art but rarely think about it in terms of building and creating my own pieces.

However, when I think about “contemporary” artists who’s work I am most attracted to when I visit a museum there are a few who I regard as influential old friends when walking around a good collection. Although she passed away in 2004, I can say that I gather the most inspiration from looking at an Agnes Martin painting than any other work of art. During a lecture, I once made the statement that I consider myself a minimalist. The entire audience laughed. It was not a joke. Although, I understand that my work is filled with visual abundance, most of my pieces are completely monochromatic. This homogeneous color scheme allows the viewer to explore the subtelies of form and the dedication to craft inherent in all of the shapes in the work and not just simply be overwhelmed by abundance. I find this subtlety inherent in an Agnes Martin painting. When standing in front of her work my mind fills in her paintings with new work of my own that I never realized existed. It is a magical occurrence that I cannot really explain.

I attribute the horror vacui nature of my work directly to two children’s book authors and illustrators, Martin Handford of the Where’s Waldo series and Audrey and Audrey and Don Wood of the book Balloonia. The illustrations in these children’s books had more of an influence on my developing artistic brain than any other work of art I would later encounter as an adult. I strive to have my work be similar to these to books where a viewer can return to the piece again and again and still find new surprises and moments of intrigue.

– Amber Cowan 2018

Join us!

Habatat Glass invites you to celebrate the
46th year of our International Glass Exhibition.

We are extremely proud to have founded the oldest and largest annual glass exhibition in the world.
Grand Opening: Saturday, April 28 at 8pm | Exhibition April 28- June 22