Artist

A recent emotion expressing itself in my work is the particular pain of parenting teenagers. How in the face of seemingly constant abuse by our kids/captors, it’s still possible to nurture feelings of love and affection- classic Stolkholm Syndrome, classic motherhood.

From quilts and teapots to sailors’ valentines, and cages, I am interested in the capacity .....

A recent emotion expressing itself in my work is the particular pain of parenting teenagers. How in the face of seemingly constant abuse by our kids/captors, it’s still possible to nurture feelings of love and affection- classic Stolkholm Syndrome, classic motherhood.

From quilts and teapots to sailors’ valentines, and cages, I am interested in the capacity of common objects to evoke and express emotion. I look to my contemporaries in the world of literature and the written word to clarify my narrative before I start a series. By example I would site, The Folded Clock: A Diary by Heidi Julavits. A non-chronological diary full of insights about relationships, it loops back upon itself using the structural conceit of traditional diary entries. Julavits’ repetitive template weaves the piece together, echoing the visual principle of design. Relating deeply personal observations about her interactions with her children, partners, and parents, I see my own self, reflected in her words. Repetition is a powerful tool, as in Doris Salcedo’s 2003 installation of 1,550 wooden chairs stacked between two buildings in Istanbul, Turkey. In their multitude, each individual object retains the power to tell an individual story of displacement. While I am neither a writer, nor an abstract artist, these influences feed my work, strengthen my intent, and push me to examine how to present personal concerns to a universal audience.

In Upholding Community Standards, a series I think of broadly as coloring book pieces, rumination on escape routes has become cages, and led me to question what is a cage, and do we create our own captivity? These are representations of mothers, captives in their role of providing essential structure. With no ability to incarcerate, the work contrasts the ideas of captivity and refuge; places for solitary confinement and sympathetic equanimity. Grouped together, the portraits represent the ways women rely on friends for emotional and functional support, forming the embodiment of complex temporary exit strategies.

-Kari Russell-Poole, 2018

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Habatat Glass invites you to celebrate the
46th year of our International Glass Exhibition.

We are extremely proud to have founded the oldest and largest annual glass exhibition in the world.
Grand Opening: Saturday, April 28 at 8pm | Exhibition April 28- June 22